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China lays out official stance on trade talks with U.S.

Posted by on Jun 2, 2019 in Asia, Beijing, China, fedex, Government, Huawei, Policy, smartphone, Trade war, U.S. China trade war, U.S. government, United States | 0 comments

On Sunday, China released a comprehensive white paper to formalize its positions on trade negotiations with the U.S. The set of statements come as the trade war escalates and Beijing threatens to hit back with a retaliatory blacklist of U.S. firms. Here are some key takeaways from the press conference announcing the white paper:

U.S. ‘responsible’ for stalled trade talks

The “U.S. government bears responsibility” for setbacks in trade talks, chided the paper, adding that the U.S. has imposed additional tariffs on Chinese goods that impede economic cooperation between the two countries and globally.

While it’s “common” for both sides to propose “adjustments to the text and language” in ongoing negotiations, the U.S. administration “kept changing its demands” in the “previous more than ten rounds of negotiations,” the paper alleged.

On the other hand, reports of China backtracking on previous trade deals are mere “mudslinging,” Wang Shouwen, the Chinese vice minister of commerce and deputy China international trade representative, said as he led the Sunday presser.

China ready to fight if forced to

China does not want a trade war with the U.S, but it’s not afraid of one and will fight one if necessary, said the white paper.

Beijing’s position on trade talks has never changed — that cooperation serves the interests of both countries and conflict can only hurt both — according to the paper. CNBC’s Eunice Yoon pointed out that Beijing’s latest stance repeats previous statements made back in September.

Deals must be equal

Difference and frictions remain on the economic and trade fronts between the two countries, but China is willing to work with the U.S. to reach a “mutually beneficial and win-win agreement,” stated the paper. However, cooperation has to be based on principles and must not compromise China’s core interests.

“Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed,” Wang said.

He said one needs not “overinterpret” China’s soon-to-come entity list, adding that it mainly targets foreign companies that run against market rules and violate the spirit of contracts, cut off supplies to Chinese firms for uncommercial reasons, damage the legitimate rights of Chinese companies, or threaten China’s national security and public interests.

China respects IP rights

The paper also touched on issues that are at the center of the prolonged U.S.-China trade dispute, including China’s dealings with intellectual property rights. U.S. allegations of China over IP theft are “an unfounded fabrication,” said the white paper, adding that China has made great efforts in recent years to protect and enforce IP rights.

Wang claimed that China pays the U.S. a significant sum to license IP rights every year. Of the $35.6 billion it shelled out for IP fees in 2018, nearly a quarter went to the U.S.

Investments are mutually beneficial

The white paper claimed that bilateral investments between the two countries are mutually beneficial rather than undermining for U.S. interests when taken account of “trade in goods and services as well as two-way investment.”

The Chinese government also pushed back at claims that it exerts influence on businesses’ overseas investments.

“The government is not involved in companies’ business activities and does not ask them to make specific investments or acquisitions,” said Wang. “Even if we make such requests, companies won’t obey.”

In response to China’s probe into FedEx over Huawei packages that went stray, Wang assured that “foreign businesses are welcome to operate legally in China, but when they break rules, they have to cooperate with regulatory investigations. That’s indisputable.”

The Shenzhen-based smartphone and telecom giant has been hit hard by during the trade negotiations as the Trump administration orders U.S. businesses to sever ties with the Chinese firm.


Source: The Tech Crunch

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Foxconn halts some production lines for Huawei phones, according to reports

Posted by on Jun 1, 2019 in android, Apple, Companies, Donald Trump, Foxconn, Google, Huawei, mobile phones, operating system, president, shenzhen, smart phone, smartphone, Smartphones, TC, telecommunications, United States, Xiaomi | 0 comments

Huawei, the Chinese technology giant whose devices are at the center of a far-reaching trade dispute between the U.S. and Chinese governments, is reducing orders for new phones, according to a report in The South China Morning Post.

According to unnamed sources, the Taiwanese technology manufacturer Foxconn has halted production lines for several Huawei phones after the Shenzhen-based company reduced orders. Foxconn also makes devices for most of the major smart phone vendors including Apple and Xiaomi (in addition to Huawei).

In the aftermath of President Donald Trump’s declaration of a “national emergency” to protect U.S. networks from foreign technologies, Huawei and several of its affiliates were barred from acquiring technologies from U.S. companies.

The blacklist has impacted multiple lines of Huawei’s business including it handset manufacturing capabilities given the company’s reliance on Google’s Android operating system for its smartphones.

In May, Google reportedly suspended business with Huawei, according to a Reuters report. Last year, Huawei shipped over 200 million handsets and the company had a stated goal to become the world’s largest vendor of smartphones by 2020.

These reports from The South China Morning Post are the clearest indication that the ramifications of the U.S. blacklisting are beginning to be felt across Huawei’s phone business outside of China.

Huawei was already under fire for security concerns, and will be forced to contend with more if it can no longer provide Android updates to global customers.

Contingency planning is already underway at Huawei. The company has built its own Android -based operating system, and can use the stripped down, open source version of Android that ships without Google Mobile Services. For now, its customers also still have access to Google’s app store. But if the company is forced to make developers sell their apps on a siloed Huawei-only store, it could face problems from users outside of China.

Huawei and the Chinese government are also retaliating against the U.S. efforts. The company has filed a legal motion to challenge the U.S. ban on its equipment, calling it “unconstitutional.”  And Huawei has sent home its American employees deployed at R&D functions at its Shenzhen headquarters.

It has also asked its Chinese employees to limit conversations with overseas visitors, and cease any technical meetings with their U.S. contacts.

Still, any reduction in orders would seem to indicate that the U.S. efforts to stymie Huawei’s expansion (at least in its smartphone business) are having an impact.

A spokesperson for Huawei U.S. did not respond to a request for comment.


Source: The Tech Crunch

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EU calls for increased security, but doesn’t ban Huawei 5G products

Posted by on Mar 26, 2019 in eu, European Union, Huawei, Security | 0 comments

The European Union’s current approach to potential cybersecurity threats posed by Huawei 5G products is caution, but not an outright ban. The topic was the subject of new recommendations issued by the EU this week in response to U.S. calls to boycott the electronics giant over fears around its connection to the Chinese government.

The report rightly notes that coming 5G technologies will form the backbone of some of society’s most foundational elements, from banking, to transportation, health, industry and even democracies. But it stops short of suggesting a similar outright ban to the one implemented by the U.S. government.

”5G technology will transform our economy and society and open massive opportunities for people and businesses,” European digital chief Andrus Ansip said in a statement tied to the recommendation. “But we cannot accept this happening without full security built in. It is therefore essential that 5G infrastructures in the EU are resilient and fully secure from technical or legal backdoors.”

The language certainly doesn’t close the door to an outright ban moving forward, as the EU looks to increase scrutiny around these technologies, but it does mark part of a larger trend to push back on the U.S. government’s calls for blanket bans.

Addressing a telecoms conference in Barcelona last month European digital commissioner Mariya Gabriel said Europe must have “a common approach” to the challenge of network security, warning there is a risk of fragmentation if Member States take diverging decisions “trying to protect themselves”.

She said at the time that the Commission was preparing to take steps soon — but did not speak up in favor of an outright ban, also leaving the door open to a softer approach.


Source: The Tech Crunch

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Canadian government allows Huawei CFO’s US extradition case to proceed

Posted by on Mar 1, 2019 in Huawei, Meng Wanzhou, Policy | 0 comments

Late last year, Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou was arrested in Vancouver, Canada over alleged violations of U.S. trade sanctions with Iran. This week, the Canadian government announced it will allow for the executive’s extradition to proceed.

Officials in the Department of Justice Canada have issued an Authority to Proceed, a proclamation that officially begins the extradition process, which could send Wanzhou to the U.S. to face charges.

Wanzhou, who is also the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei, has found herself at the center of an ongoing dispute between the smartphone maker and the U.S. government. In January, an indictment was unsealed linking Wanzhou to alleged bank fraud designed to help the company circumvent U.S./Iranian sanctions.

“The decision follows a thorough and diligent review of the evidence in this case,” the Canadian DOJ writes in a statement. “The Department is satisfied that the requirements set out by the Extradition Act for the issuance of an Authority to Proceed have been met and there is sufficient evidence to be put before an extradition judge for decision.”

It goes on to note that this is just the first step toward extradition. A judge will hear the case, followed by the Minister of Justice, who will ultimately decide whether Wanzhou should be surrendered.

Update: Attorneys for Meng Wanzhou have provided TechCrunch a statement regarding today’s news.

We are disappointed that the Minister of Justice has decided to issue an Authority to Proceed in the face of the political nature of the U.S., charges and where the President of the United States has repeatedly stated that he would interfere in Ms. Meng’s case if he thought it would assist the U.S. negotiations with China over a trade deal.

We are also concerned that the Minister has approved an ATP in circumstances where the conduct alleged to be an offence in the U.S. would not be an offence in Canada. This is an affront to the foundational extradition principle of double criminality.

Our client maintains that she is innocent of any wrongdoing and that the U.S. prosecution and extradition constitutes an abuse of the processes of law.

Our client looks forward to having her rights vindicated in the judicial phase of the extradition process.

 


Source: The Tech Crunch

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The best of MWC 2019

Posted by on Mar 1, 2019 in Hardware, Huawei, Mobile, mwc, mwc 2019, Samsung | 0 comments

After years of promises, 5G finally arrived at MWC 2019 — kind of, sort of. Barcelona served as the launching pad for several 5G handsets, set to arrive later this year. Though your actual 5G mileage may vary.

Foldable displays, another long-promised smartphone tech, also had its moment in the sun. Several companies debuted foldables — some were actual handsets with actual price tags, while others fell firmly within the concept camp. And pretty much all of them were behind glass.

Other notable trends for the event included cameras, AR/VR and security of all sorts. Here are the highlights and lowlights from the world’s biggest mobile show. All in all, we’re here for the weirdness.

5G comes of age

It’s been an MWC talking point for years now, but at this week’s show, the first 5G handsets finally arrived.

Huawei Mate X
LG V50 ThinQ 5G
Samsung Galaxy Fold
Samsung Galaxy S10
Xiaomi Mi Mix 3
ZTE Axon 10 Pro 5G

OnePlus, which promised last year that it would be among the first to hop on the 5G train, didn’t have a handset to announce, but it did demo a prototype and announce an initiative for 5G app devs.

Unfolding the future 

Time to unfold the checkbook. The first foldables are here, carrying an average price of ~$2,000. That’s like two phones for the price of, well, two phones. Whether or not the phones will be worth it, however, is another question entirely.

Huawei Mate X
Samsung Galaxy Fold

TCL showed off a prototype at the show, promising to deliver a more affordable take on the space at some point next year. Oppo, too, is still very much in the prototype phase.

AR/VR/MR

The biggest hit of the world’s biggest phone show may not have been a phone at all. Microsoft used the event to launch the second generation of its HoloLens, a headset firmly focused on business.

Microsoft HoloLens 2
Microsoft Azure Kinect
Vive Focus Plus
Qualcomm XR chips

Security

Huawei had a lot to say about accusations of security threats around its 5G equipment. Ditto for the European Commission’s digital commissioner. Android, meanwhile, will be getting more password-less logins.

Misc

Energizer’s 18,000 mAh phone
Light is expanding from smartphone cameras to self-driving cars
HTC’s blockchain phone can now be purchased with fiat currency
Sprint to launch 5G service in 4 cities in May
Facebook expands its internet infrastructure projects
New microSD format promises insane transfer speeds, better battery life
Nubia’s ‘wearable smartphone’ might be the next step for flexible displays


Source: The Tech Crunch

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Huawei: “The US security accusation of our 5G has no evidence. Nothing.”

Posted by on Feb 26, 2019 in 4G, 5g, 5g security, Asia, cellular networks, China, Edward Snowden, Europe, European Commission, European Union, geopolitics, Huawei, Mariya Gabriel, Mobile, mwc 2019, Network Security, Security, telecommunications, trump, United States | 0 comments

Huawei’s rotating chairman Guo Ping kicked off a keynote speech this morning at the world’s biggest mobile industry tradeshow with a wry joke. “There has never been more interest in Huawei,” he told delegates at Mobile World Congress. “We must be doing something right!”

The Chinese company is seeking to dispel suspicion around the security of its 5G network equipment which has been accelerated by U.S. president Trump who has been urging U.S. allies not to buy kit or services from Huawei. (And some, including Australia, have banned carriers from using Huawei kit.)

Last week Trump also tweet-shamed U.S. companies — saying they needed to step up their efforts to rollout 5G networks or “get left behind”.

In an MWC keynote speech yesterday the European Commission’s digital commissioner Mariya Gabriel signalled the executive is prepared to step in and regulate to ensure a “common approach” on the issue of network security — to avoid the risk of EU member states taking individual actions that could delay 5G rollouts across Europe.

Huawei appeared to welcome the prospect today.

“Government and the mobile operators should work together to agree what this assurance testing and certification rating for Europe will be,” said Guo, suggesting that’s Huawei’s hope for any Commission action on 5G security.

“Let experts decide whether networks are safe or not,” he added, implying Trump is the opposite of an expert. “Huawei has a strong track record in security for three decades. Serving three billion people around the world. The U.S. security accusation of our 5G has no evidence. Nothing.”

Geopolitical tensions about network security have translated into the biggest headache for Huawei which has positioned itself as a key vendor for 5G kit right as carriers are preparing to upgrade their existing cellular networks to the next-gen flavor.

Guo claimed today that Huawei is “the first company who can deploy 5G networks at scale”, giving a pitch for what he described as “powerful, simple and intelligent” next-gen network kit, while clearly enjoying the opportunity of being able to agree with U.S. president Trump in public — that “the U.S. needs powerful, faster and smarter 5G”. 🔥

But any competitive lead in next-gen network tech also puts the company in prime position for political blowback linked to espionage concerns related to the Chinese state’s access to data held or accessed by commercial companies.

Huawei’s strategy to counter this threat has been to come out fighting for its commercial business — and it had plenty more of that spirit on show this morning. As well as a bunch of in-jokes. Most notably a reference to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden which drew a knowing ripple of laughter from the audience.

“We understand innovation is nothing without security,” said Guo, segwaying from making a sales pitch for Huawei’s 5G network solutions straight into the giant geopolitical security question looming over the conference.

“Prism, prism on the wall who is the most trustworthy of them all?” he said, throwing up a colorful slide to illustrate the joke. “It’s a very important question. And if you don’t ask them that you can go ask Edward Snowden.”

You can’t use “a crystal ball to manage cybersecurity”, Guo went on, dubbing it “a challenge we all share” and arguing that every player in the mobile industry has responsibility to defuse the network security issue — from kit vendors to carriers and standards bodies, as well as regulators.

“With 5G we have made a lot of progress over 4G and we can proudly say that 5G is safer than 4G. As a vendor we don’t operate carriers network, and we don’t all carry data. Our responsibility — what we promise — is that we don’t do anything bad,” he said. “We don’t do bad things.”

“Let me says this as clear as possible,” he went on, putting up another slide that literally underlined the point. “Huawei has not and will never plant backdoors. And we will never allow anyone to do so in our equipment.

“We take this responsibility very seriously.”

Guo’s pitch on network trust and security was to argue that where 5G networks are concerned security is a collective industry responsibility — which in turn means every player in the chain plays a monitoring role that allows for networks to be collectively trusted.

“Carriers are responsible for secure operations of their own networks. 5G networks are private networks. The boundary between different networks are clear. Carriers can prevent outside attacks with firewalls and security gateways. For internal threats carriers can manage, monitor and audit all vendors and partners to make sure their network elements are secure,” he said, going on to urge the industry to work together on standards which he described as “our shared responsibility”.

“To build safer networks we need to standardize cybersecurity requirements and these standards must be verifiable for all vendors and all carriers,” he said, adding that Huawei “fully supports” the work of industry standards and certification bodies the GSMA and 3GPP who he also claimed have “strong capabilities to verify 5G’s security”.

Huawei’s strategy to defuse geopolitical risk by appealing to the industry as a whole to get behind tackling the network trust issue is a smart one given the uncertainty generated by Trump’s attacks is hardly being welcomed by anyone in the mobile business.

Huawei’s headache might lead to the industry as a whole catching a cold — and no one at MWC wants that.

Later in the keynote Guo also pointed to the awkward “irony” of the U.S Cloud Act — given the legislation allows U.S. entities to “access data across borders”.

U.S. overreach on accessing the personal data of foreign citizens continues to cause major legal headaches in Europe as a result of the clash between its national security interest and EU citizens fundamental privacy rights. So Guo’s point there won’t have been lost on an MWC audience packed with European delegates attending the annual tradeshow.

“So for best technology and greater security choose Huawei. Please choose Huawei!” Guo finished, ending his keynote with a line that could very well make it as an upbeat marketing slogan writ large on one of the myriad tech-packed booths here at Fira Gran Via, Barcelona.


Source: The Tech Crunch

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Huawei’s folding phone debuts this month

Posted by on Feb 1, 2019 in foldables, Hardware, Huawei, mwc, Smartphones | 0 comments

Huawei mobile chief Richard Yu has already made mention of the company’s upcoming foldable phone amid talks of smartphone world domination. This morning, however, we caught our first glimpse of the handset in profile, along with the promise of more, arriving February 24, during Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

Foldables are very much heating up to be the highlight of the 2019 smartphone race. Royole’s already shipping a handset to devs, and Samsung is set to give us a lot more info at an Unpacked event a mere days before MWC kicks off.

Xiaomi’s offering is merely a concept, but it’s the coolest of the bunch; and then there’s the return of the Motorola Razr, which seems, if nothing else, a solid play for smartphone nostalgia. Google, too, has been working hard at building in support for what’s sure to be a broad range of different foldable form factors, as hardware companies fumble to find the best design.

Also notable on the teaser is the Connecting the Future text, which appears to be a reference to the phone’s inclusion of 5G, which would really put the handset smack dab in the middle of the mobile zeitgeist. It would also likely further drive up an already pricey design.


Source: The Tech Crunch

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H-1B changes will simplify application process

Posted by on Feb 1, 2019 in Asia, borders, Britain, China, Government, Huawei, immigration, Meng Wanzhou, Policy, Talent, TC | 0 comments

The federal government yesterday published the final rule for changes to the H-1B visa program, which is one of the primary conduits for technical talent to come and work in the United States.

There are two key changes coming with the rule. First, the government will require applicants for an H-1B visa to electronically register with the immigration office for the H-1B lottery before they submit their applications or documentation, starting in 2020.

Due to hard caps imposed by Congress on the number of workers who can be admitted under the program, tens of thousands of people apply for a visa who ultimately do not attain it. Under the current process, applicants must submit their entire applications including supporting documentation in order to apply for a lottery run by USCIS, the immigration authority.

Last year, roughly 190,000 applicants applied for 85,000 total slots. That means 105,000 people put together complete applications but lost out on the lottery.

Under the new rule that will be in force for the 2020 H-1B process (i.e. two years from now), applicants will first register with USCIS electronically, which will process the lottery. If selected in the lottery, an applicant would then be invited to submit their application and supporting materials. The idea is that you only have to do all the work of applying when there is an actual slot available.

The change is likely to cut into the revenue of immigration attorneys, who today prepare full applications for all applicants. A typical H-1B visa application retainer for an attorney today in Silicon Valley runs in the low thousands of dollars each, with companies picking up the tab. I am sure attorneys will still recommend doing some prep work, but the new rules should cut costs for employers.

The second change of the final rule has to do with how the lottery is conducted. Be very careful here, as the changes are somewhat subtle and there is a lot of malarkey being written across the internet about it.

Under the H-1B program, there are two pools of applicants: let’s call them the regular pool and the advanced degree holders pool. There is a cap of 65,000 for the regular pool, and 20,000 for the advanced degree pool, which is limited to applicants holding a master’s degree or better.

In today’s process, advanced degree applicants first go through the lottery of the advanced degree pool, and if they fail, they get added to the regular pool for the second lottery. In the new process just confirmed by USCIS, that process is inverted: the regular pool lottery will be run first with all applicants, and then the advanced degree pool will happen second with advanced degree applicants who failed in the first lottery.

What does that mean for applicants? Well, we have to do a bit of table napkin probability math to understand* (feel free to skip ahead if you just want the answer).

Using last year’s numbers there were 95,885 advanced degree applicants for 20,000 spots, so a roughly 20.85% chance of receiving a visa. That means 75,885 advanced degree applicants who lost out were then added to the regular pool of 94,213 applicants. That’s 170,098 applicants for 65,000 visas, or roughly a 38.21% chance of getting a visa. Across the two lotteries then, advanced degree holders statistically would have gotten 20,000 visas from the first lottery, and then 38.21% of 75,885 or 28,998 visas from the regular pool lottery. So an advanced degree holder had a 51.1% of getting an H-1B visa, compared to 38.21% for regular pool applicants.

That’s the old probabilities, so let’s see how reversing the sequence of lotteries change the probabilities. Now, 95,885 advanced degree holders join 94,213 regular applicants for 65,000 spots, for a success rate of 34.19%. That means 32,786 advanced degree holders will be successful in the regular pool. From there, the 63,099 advanced degree applicants who were not successful would get to go through the advanced degree lottery of 20,000 spots, a probability rate of 31.70%. Combined then, you have 20,000 + 32,786 = 52,786 successful advanced degree holders out of 95,885, for a combined statistical success rate of 55.05%.

Net-net, the changes in the lottery sequence mean that advanced degree holders would have been successful 55.05% of the time last year, compared with 51.1% under the previous system. For regular applicants, the success rate declines from 38.21% to 31.70%.

So to be accurate in language, I would say that USCIS is (from a statistical point of view) “placing an additional emphasis” on advanced degree holders. It’s a meaningful adjustment if you are applying of course, but ultimately nothing has changed since immigration priorities are written into the law and the executive branch doesn’t have much flexibility to change these systems.

(*One side note: that probability math is “rough” because the H-1B program has a variety of small preferences and set asides that make the probability math unique for each person. Citizens of Chile and Singapore get special treatment, and if you apply to work in Guam and a few other territories, you also have your own special process).

Talking about borders: Huawei and smartphone privacy

The Huawei logo is seen in the center of Warsaw, Poland

(Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

The U.S., like many countries around the world, doesn’t provide a lot of privacy rights at the border. The country can scan the electronic devices of any traveler, and save files and other data in those sweeps, and such tactics are increasingly common much to the chagrin of privacy advocates like the ACLU.

But there is a benefit of these sweeps when it comes to closing in on an international investigation. The U.S. Department of Justice charged Huawei’s CFO Meng Wanzhou with a variety of crimes including bank fraud and wire fraud this week in connection with Huawei’s alleged breach of U.S. sanctions on Iran.

From the indictment, some of the key evidence for the case comes from a sweep of Meng’s smartphone while she passed through JFK Airport, where border officials captured Huawei’s talking points about the Iran / Skycom situation. From the indictment, “When she entered the United States, MENG was carrying an electronic device that contained a file in unallocated space—indicating that the file may have been deleted […]”

As with debates over end-to-end encryption, there are complexities to the level of privacy that should be offered at national borders. While the general right to privacy should be protected, law enforcement should also have the tools it needs to stop crimes within a proper due process system.

Talking about borders: Brexit and manufacturing scale

(Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

I talked about manufacturing scale yesterday in the context of Foxconn’s multiple shutdowns of its factories in Wisconsin and Guangzhou this week. Apple isn’t the only one failing to find a screw these days — now the entirety of Britain’s industrial base is worried about finding components.

Bloomberg noted that British “Companies’ inventory holdings grew in January at the quickest rate in the 27-year history of IHS Markit’s survey, the group said in a report Friday.” Companies are stockpiling everything from screws and parts to medications as the risk of a no-deal Brexit increases after Parliament has repeatedly struck down plans for Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union.

Stockpile as much as you want, but China’s success over the past three decades since reform and opening up has been making its borders, customs, and ports some of the most efficient in the world. If Britain wants to compete, it needs to do the same.

TechCrunch is experimenting with new content forms. This is a rough draft of something new – provide your feedback directly to the author (Danny at danny@techcrunch.com) if you like or hate something here.

Share your feedback on your startup’s attorney

My colleague Eric Eldon and I are reaching out to startup founders and execs about their experiences with their attorneys. Our goal is to identify the leading lights of the industry and help spark discussions around best practices. If you have an attorney you thought did a fantastic job for your startup, let us know using this short Google Forms survey and also spread the word. We will share the results and more in the coming weeks.

What’s Next

  • More work on societal resilience
  • I’m reading a Korean novel called The Human Jungle by Cho Chongnae that places a multi-national cast of characters in China’s economy. It’s been a great read a quarter of the way in.

This newsletter is written with the assistance of Arman Tabatabai from New York

Updated: I re-hyphenated my H1-Bs to H-1Bs. Also, the electronic registration will officially be changed two cycles from now following public comments on the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. The original intention was to launch it this year.


Source: The Tech Crunch

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China continues 5G push despite economic slowdown and Huawei setbacks

Posted by on Jan 30, 2019 in 5g, Asia, Australia, Beijing, Canada, China, Government, Huawei, LTE, manufacturing, mobile technology, network technology, spy, telecommunications, Transportation, virtual reality, Wearables, wireless technology | 0 comments

China will fast-track the issuance of commercial licenses for 5G as part of a national plan to boost consumer spending, said a notice published this week by the National Development and Reform Commission. The move appears to be multifaceted, for 5G plays a key role in China’s bid to lead the global technology race and one of its biggest 5G champions, Huawei, has been facing troubles on a global scale.

In its statement, the economic regulator calls on local governments to support the promotion and showcase of services utilizing the super-fast network technology. Ultra-high definition TVs, virtual/augmented reality handsets and other futuristic products will be eligible for government subsidies, though the regulator didn’t outline the detailed criteria.

The acceleration of 5G licenses comes as Beijing copes with a weakening national economy, a move that will “drum up demand with upgraded technology experiences across devices, automotive and manufacturing leveraging 5G technology,” said Neil Shah, research director at Counterpoint Research, to TechCrunch. 5G is on course to generate 6.3 trillion yuan ($947 billion) worth of economic output and 8 million jobs for China by 2030, according to estimates from the China Academy of Information and Communications Technology.

Beijing has been gearing up to be the world leader in the next-generation network tech, pouring resources into 5G research and infrastructure. But it has been hit with a speed bump overseas as western countries grow increasingly wary of spy threat posed by Chinese 5G equipments. A souped-up domestic drive, therefore, could help neutralize some of the global setbacks faced by its 5G crown jewels like Huawei.

The U.S. and Australia have banned local firms from procuring equipment from Huawei, and Canada and the U.K. are currently reviewing whether to continue using 5G parts made by the Chinese telecom equipment giant. Meanwhile, Huawei is facing a list of criminal charges from the U.S. for stealing state secrets and its financial chief Meng is accused of bank fraud.

“Aaccelerating 5G licenses should indirectly help Huawei gain competitive edge for 5G considering it will be supplying solutions to the world’s largest mobile cellular market, China,” observes Counterpoint’s Shah. “This also gives Huawei an early platform to showcase its technology to the world and attract more global business.”

Huawei has continued with its 5G push despite being dogged by a string of global woes. Last week, the Shenzhen-based conglomerate unviled a 5G chipset for multiple commercial uses across smartphones, home and work. The chip, dubbed the Balong 5000, will be launching in February at a Barcelona tech trade show.


Source: The Tech Crunch

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Canada’s Telus says partner Huawei is ‘reliable’: reports

Posted by on Jan 21, 2019 in 3g, 5g, Ambassador, Asia, Australia, Beijing, Canada, China, Donald Trump, Huawei, Justin Trudeau, Meng Wanzhou, New Zealand, Policy, Ren Zhengfei, Security, spy, telecommunications, telus, the wall street journal, United Kingdom, United States, vancouver, White House, zte | 0 comments

The US-China tension over Huawei is leaving telecommunications companies around the world at a crossroad, but one spoke out last week. Telus, one of Canada’s largest phone companies showed support for its Chinese partner despite a global backlash against Huawei over cybersecurity threats.

“Clearly, Huawei remains a viable and reliable participant in the Canadian telecommunications space, bolstered by globally leading innovation, comprehensive security measures, and new software upgrades,” said an internal memo signed by a Telus executive that The Globe and Mail obtained.

The Vancouver-based firm is among a handful of Canadian companies that could potentially leverage the Shenzhen-based company to build out 5G systems, the technology that speeds up not just mobile connection but more crucially powers emerging fields like low-latency autonomous driving and 8K video streaming. TechCrunch has contacted Telus for comments and will update the article when more information becomes available.

The United States has long worried that China’s telecom equipment makers could be beholden to Beijing and thus pose espionage risks. As fears heighten, President Donald Trump is reportedly mulling a boycott of Huawei and ZTE this year, according to Reuters. The Wall Street Journal reported last week that US federal prosecutors may bring criminal charges against Huawei for stealing trade secrets.

Australia and New Zealand have both blocked local providers from using Huawei components. The United Kingdom has not officially banned Huawei but its authorities have come under pressure to take sides soon.

Canada, which is part of the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing network alongside Australia, New Zealand, the UK and the US, is still conducting a security review ahead of its 5G rollout but has been urged by neighboring US to steer clear of Huawei in building the next-gen tech.

China has hit back at spy claims against its tech crown jewel over the past months. Last week, its ambassador to Canada Lu Shaye warned that blocking the world’s largest telecom equipment maker may yield repercussions.

“I always have concerns that Canada may make the same decision as the US, Australia and New Zealand did. And I believe such decisions are not fair because their accusations are groundless,” Lu said at a press conference. “As for the consequences of banning Huawei from 5G network, I am not sure yet what kind of consequences will be, but I surely believe there will be consequences.”

Last week also saw Huawei chief executive officer Ren Zhengfei appear in a rare interview with international media. At the roundtable, he denied security charges against the firm he founded in 1987 and cautioned the exclusion of Chinese firms may delay plans in the US to deliver ultra-high-speed networks to rural populations — including to the rich.

“If Huawei is not involved in this, these districts may have to pay very high prices in order to enjoy that level of experience,” argued Ren. “Those countries may voluntarily approach Huawei and ask Huawei to sell them 5G products rather than banning Huawei from selling 5G systems.”

The Huawei controversy comes as the US and China are locked in a trade war that’s sending reverberations across countries that rely on the US for security protection and China for investment and increasingly skilled — not just cheap — labor.

Canada got caught between the feuding giants after it arrested Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who’s also Ren’s daughter, at the request of US authorities. The White House is now facing a deadline at the end of January to extradite Meng. Meanwhile, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Trump are urging Beijing to release two Canadian citizens who Beijing detained following Meng’s arrest.


Source: The Tech Crunch

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